Super Sleeve

The super sleeve isn't totally new. Rosetta Getty, Jacquemus, Vetements and Charlie May have all been championing it in recent seasons.

Say those brands and you automatically summon an effortlessly cool vibe. One that is discreet, edgy, laid back and, most likely, worn by the type of girls you wish you were.

Michael Kors definitely doesn't fit into the same mix.

Kors is decidedly more mainstream than most of the designers that have been embracing the super sleeve. He's known for a refined aesthetic that's tailored and reserved - the sort of clothes that are practical and veer somewhere between what you might expect from Tory Burch and Ralph Lauren. He's as American as they come and doesn't usually mess with the failsafe styles that keep customers coming back time and time again. To summarize, he's conservative. And the super sleeve, which obscures your hands thereby making it difficult to eat or use your phone, is the opposite of conservative.


Thankfully Kors decided to relax a bit with this collection and embrace a styling trick that transformed the feel of the whole show. 


Predictable and preppy looks suddenly got roughed up and messy due to the super sleeve. Kors shows that the easiest way to update a classic white shirt is to stretch the length of the sleeve a few inches. There is a youthful nonchalance about this collection and it's all due to that wonderful super sleeve.

Benefits of wearing the super sleeve include the ability to go without gloves, the lack of a needed manicure, and the fact that you have an ever present tea cozy attached to your arm. Personally I'm quite keen because I figure I'll be using the extra long sleeve to wipe up the snot of a newly acquired tot come fall.

Photos via Vogue Runway

Michael Kors fall 2016